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right now and heads up the civil rights division and president obama apparently pleased with him and wanting him to head over to head up the labor department and the wall street journal had a piece today that talked about how, quote, political muscle undermind the rule of law under mr. perez's civil rieghts division. in simple terms, what is the allegation that mr. perez did? >> one of the allegations is that he interfered and cost the american taxpayers 180 million dollars by getting a case dismissed where he didn't want to face the supreme court decision and gave up two very valid cases again, 180 million dollars of taxpayer money in st. paul. this was unprecedented. it had been set for additional this nominee has been expressed as not having been candid in his testimony. candid is it kind of one of the funny words in politics that means he didn't tell the whole truth. this is also somebody who refused to do his fundamental job which is to fully prosecute voter intimidation that fell under his watch. these are just some of the areas of concern that i think that senators have an
this equal protection idea. they were about race. >> scott: since the civil war. >> right. the historical case. there are parallels between these kinds of discrimination. here is another difference. in 1967 when the supreme court in loving versus virginia banned gay marriage, in that time, only 16 states retained such a ban. the previous decade plus, 14 states moved away from the bans. we still have a situation where 40 states prohibit same-sex marriage. that may change in four or five years. that is different with the mainstream. >> i would say one of the things that is interesting is how fast public opinion is moving. in the case of interracial marriage in 1967, there were polls showing lower levels of support when the supreme court acted than there are today. there is the fact that many states and one reason is a big regional divide. on the east coast and west coast, there is more sympathy than in the south and middle of the country. >> scott: that goes if they strike down prop 8, they have several options if they strike it down. more or less it is california only option or -- >> there
from imprisoned felons. this is a basic civil rights issue and i don't think it's the issue that divides the court. >> joining me now, patricia and head of the supreme court practice. jonathan turley. hello to both of you. welcome. >> hi, alex. >> patricia, i'll begin with you as -- well, let's talk about in terms of prop 8, what we heard just there, correct, i mean, the right to mary already, has it been well-established? >> well, the right to marry is but what the court hasn't grappled with is what is the definition of marriage and that, as we know, is the issue hotly contested in this case and what they will be confronting and in particular what is the role of the courts in that, the role of the states, the role of the federal constitution. so there's much for them to grapple with still. >> jonathan, breakdown for the viewers, if you will, the key issues here for each case. name one key issue for each of them. >> well, first of all, on the threshold level, one is doma, the statute of the defense of marriage act that has formed a discrimination against those who have same-
department's policing problems. civil rights attorney, james chanen will discuss the federal oversight and the police department's decision to hire william bratton for new crime- fighting strategies. the meeting is set for 6:00 tonight at berkeley cop watch. that's at 2022 blake street in berkeley. that meeting, by the way, is open and it's free to the public. >>> 7:50. hardwood flooring is being put in this morning to get hp pavilion ready for march madness. the arena is hosting the second and third rounds of the ncaa tournament thursday through saturday. cal will stays unlv there on thursday. cal is the 12th seed of the east region. unlv is the fifth seeded team. it's 5-1 verses cal. [ cheers ] >> cheers broke out in morago as the st. mary's basketball team was selected to the tournament. the gaels will play tennessee tomorrow night in dayton, ohio. if they win, they will become the 11th seed of the midwest region and play the sixth seed memphis on thursday. >>> 7:51. the ncaa tournament is very important to advertisers as well. total tv revenu
me if i am wrong, i don't recall you ever complaining about ministers who were involved in the civil rights movement or the anti-vietnam war demonstrations or about black creators who have been so involved in american politics. is it all conservative that you object to? >> no, what i object to -- [applause] >> -- what i object to is someone seeking to use his faith to question the faith of another or to use that faith and seek the power of government to impose it on others. >> at that time, diane sawyer was there. you were there. it is interesting that those two men, especially mr. mondale, agreed that you and diane sawyer could be on the panel. >> yeah and jim was the other one from "the new york daily news." >> i was certainly surprised. >> i was a reporter for "the baltimore sun" and covered the national politics. i was also, by then, i had gotten more interested in politics, and i was writing a press column for "the american spectator" magazine. >> conservative? >> conservative. and i guess the mondale people didn't recognize that. i think my questions were very fair. i like mond
turned, civil rights law signed by lyndon johnson. to paraphrase, he said i lost the south for a generation. if you peel back what he's trying to say, anyone against this idea of diversity is going to flee the democratic party and go to the republican party. since the signing of this law, democrats have had a difficult time penetrating that bloc of the south states of the traditional southern states. and racial tension isn't part of that bloc. if the republican party really wants to move forward in terms of having diversity, it needs to acknowledge, acknowledge, not say this is who we are, but acknowledge that that part of our history is who still continues to make up a small fraction of the republican party. we're not going to allow these people to be there anymore. a cnn employee who has had shells thrown at her and called a monkey. had they gone on stage and said this is not tolerated here at the rnc, we would not embrace these people. but they didn't do that. they ignored it. >> with all the other stories going on, you may have missed this one. this week an assault ban
in challenging voter ids. perez served as the top civil rights enforcement, cracking down on discrimination. >> my parents taught me to work harkd give back to our community and make sure ladder of opportunity was there for the those coming after us. >> congressional republicans have said they plan to block perez's confirmation. alabama senator jeff sessions called the choice unfortunate. kbrerz would replace hilda solice. >> we're learning about the gunman that went on the shooting rampage at sandy hook school. reporting he kept a score sheet of past mass killings and created a data base of killing sprees and the computer says he had been studying mass killings for years before carrying out the connecticut attack. lanza killed himself afterwards. >> the authorities believe a quick response may have prevented a mass shooting at university of central florida police say a 30-year-old student pulled a fire alarm and then went back to retrieve his stash of guns and explosives. his roommate called police. they arrived to find the student daechld they believe he panicked and shot himself. police
that the civil rights tuition has been plagued before and in the tenure for the polarization and mistrust. the key issue is the testimony before -- before the committee that listened to voter intimidation case. we did not find that perez intentionally misled the commission, the report stated but added that perez's testimony did not reflect the story regarding the involvement of political appoint tees. >> the inspector jep reported that mr. perez has take an number of steps to foster a more collegial work place. >> he fended off questions why barack obama the first african-american president has not named african-americans to his cabinet for his second term. carney replies that the cabinet is unfilled so far and the president is committed to diversity. >> bret: rosen live on the north lawn. thank you. there may be trouble ahead for the president's choice to run the environmental protection agency. correspondent doug mckelway tells us why. >> the epa's release last friday of 2,000 more e-mails from former epa administration lisa jackson alias richard windsor account falls short of what a co
their candidate. on the right, southern white democrats who were against civil rights, they were being peeled off to vote for george wallace, the symbol of proud segregation. also, different problem for the democrats. people hated the vietnam war. and the president at the time was a democrat, lyndon b. johnson. so if you were against the war, as most americans at that point were -- this is the gallop polling on the war -- the number of people who thought it was a mistake -- if you were against the war as increasingly everybody was, you were so the psyched to vote for lbj's successor. so the democrats were losing their appeal in the south because of racism, and they were losing the anti-war vote. the republican candidate tried to take advantage of that split, and was this handsome devil. nixon in 1968 was running against a democratic party that he knew was split. he was, in response, pledging to get rid of the draft. and he claimed to have a plan to end the war. he argued that if you wanted the war to end, you needed to elect him. you needed to vote the democrats out of office because clearly lbj
the way for some legal changes. >> that's a great question. and you look at the role of churches and civil rights movement and when you look at the role really of societal movements, they often leap ahead of the law. and we're seeing that right now with this is an example. the fact this can happen in winston salem, again, it's the fifth largest city here in north carolina. you know, this is really unprecedented and you know, among methodist churches, you have some others in places like austin and chicago and of course, california, that that have enacted similar moves like this, but not in the deep south. not in north carolina. this is really important what's happening here. >> give me a brief answer. do you think we'll see marriage equality in your lifetime? >> in north carolina? well, you know, i write about manners, so not a great thing to ask someone their edge, but i'm hopeful that it's coming. >> all right. thank you so very much. >> thank you, michael. >> that's the ed show. the rachel maddow show starts now. >>> thanks to you at home for joining us. the great state of florida does n
fraud or fraud on wall street or public corruption or civil-rights abuses and make certain that we prioritize and make sure we are focused on the greatest threats to the american public and then to the extent toere is a determination as what the ultimate resolution is, that's up to the judge's. >> thank you. i appreciate his question. what we're going to do is introduce a bill and i will ask your comments on it, after the recess. it will be bipartisan, it will be the two of us, to set up a national commission made up of expertsrison particularly in the state's, many of them very conservative had to responde to the prison crowding more from an economic issue than any other. it will be bipartisan. we're looking for a chairman of stature or somebody who can take a year to come back and report. i think our present system is dysfunctional in the sense that very few people are working in the prisons. the prison industry program has been decimated partly because of congress. we have tried to get the bureau of prisons to adopt programs to allow them to make products that are no longer made
to the base by habeas lawyers and activists, those working for civil rights. they want to choke information out of guantanamo because it's all bad. >> michael: it seems also, colonel davis, not only is the information bad but this is not been prioritized. i'm wondering, colonel davis how does this become a priority for the president and the administration? it seems that it's a forgotten thing. is this hunger strike going to work? >> i doubt that it will. there have been hunger strikers before. there have been suicide that didn't get a lot of attention. if you look at the drone program. today the president or the white house is rumored to get the ca out of the drone business because the public is in such an uproar. so it's going to take the public standing up and saying, look, this is not in our interest to waste this money on guantanamo, and we need to close it down. >> michael: colonel morris davis, colonel david remes. thank you for sharing your expertise and insights with us. when we come back, we've been talking about guantanamo for 11, 12 years now we still can't seem to talk about gun
citizens. they could vote. way ahead on civil rights, proposing federal anti lynching loss. he spoke out to irish groups, jewish groups while at the same time that that evidence should be made american which is something that is clearly missing from our immigration debate. lou: the idea of going from melting pot to a cultural selig we never quite bring everybody together. that's like to be a very big issue. let me get your thoughts. are we going to see comprehensive immigration reform? >> i think not. when people see the price tag, the need to understand that -- well, coolidge understood. i'm engaged to marry an immigrant. nothing against immigrants. who wanted to be american. lou: fully assimilated. >> says. they are going to be -- lou: what is the point. >> what is the point. good to have you with us. highly recommend. on sale now on line in bookstores. it to have year. up next, president obama, israeli prime minister. they are really b.f. half. good friends. the cape for taking that up and more. here next. ♪ ♪ lou: joining as now, the "a-team," author, radio talk-show host, fox ne
connected the future of israel to these young people, to the civil rights movement. in fact, to his own experience, saying that it's the promise of freedom, that they have to deal with peace, and he was cheered. there was one heckler, but he was overridden by the cheers, saying that their future is really in their hands and they have to deal with the palestinian question. only a democratic israel can remain as a jewish stated and fulfill the promises. i think he hit every note in talking about the promise of israel but also he did give some very specific messages. he repeated his warning to the assad regime not to dare use chemical weapons, which are of course a direct threat to israel as well, saying that the united states will respond. and he made a very strong iron-clad commitment on iran, another thing that israelis want to hear. >> you know, interesting you mention the heckler and you talk about the charm offensive. i believe it has been called operation desert schmooze by "the atlantic." he handled that very well. he got some laughs when he said, i wouldn't feel comfortable here i
. >> reporter: one of two couples who are plaintiffs in one of the nation's biggest civil rights cases. >> it's exciting, and interesting. but we reel feel like we represent the faces of many, many other people, and we're just humbled by that. >> reporter: the u.s. supreme court on tuesday will hear oral arguments over whether the marriage ban is unconstitutional. >> for our family, it's an important struggle and there's been sacrifice, and at the same time, it's a huge honor. >> reporter: the couple has been together 13 years, and raised four boys. a ruling in their favor could mean they, and other same sex couples in california and possibly across the nation can legally marry. affording them some of the same benefits as heterosexual couples. >> healthcare, retirement. there are a number of ways in which social security wouldn't flow to either one of us, if we were ill. >> reporter: the decision was done with the consent of their sons. the couple says life has gone on, despite international attention to their case. >> life in our house has not changed very much, i have to say. we still have
. which moses did in the bible and dr. king obviously did here in america. to lead the civil rights movement. so i thought it was again, very sincere from president obama, and resonated a lot, i know jewish americans, i would guess with african-americans, also guess more broadly, with most americans, for whom the bible is still their favorite book. >> yesterday's speech when he was speaking to the students yesterday, i mean, personally i thought he hit it out of the park. there was so much applause there, he made so much common sense and i feel like he really struck an emotional tone and tried to connect with the people in the audience. how do you feel about what he said and do you think his words will resonate for some time to come? >> i thought it was an excellent speech. and yes i do think, i hope certainly that his words will resonate for some time to come. this was really a brilliantly constructed visit to israel. obviously he had long and apparently very constructive talks with prime minister netenyahu and with prime minister simon perez. but for the major address, he chose no
the civil rights movement. at 10 p.m. eastern we'll bring you our weekly "after words" program. this week david burstein, author of "fast future" sits down with host s.e. cupp. and we conclude tonight's prime time programming at 11 eastern with sandra day o'connor. her book is "out of order." visit booktv.org for more on this weekend's television schedule. >> here's a look at some books that are being published this week. bioethicist ezekiel emanuel recounts his upprescriptioning and how his immigrant parents produced three successful children including his brother rahm emanuel and ari emanuel, a hollywood agent, in "brothers emanuel." in "those angry days: roose svelte, lindbergh and america's fight over world war ii, lynne olson recounts world war ii. jeff chu presents his thoughts on religion and gay rights in "does jesus really love me: a gay christian's pilgrimage in search of god in america." in "forecast: what physics, meetology and science can teach us," mark buchanan explains how the ebb and flow of markets and the economy can relate to numerous fields of science. look for these
as important, a level playing field. we will ensure regard for civil liberties and civil rights. today, we look to our prime minister of forming his parliamentary government in the next few weeks. with on his consultations parliament's come up which is an extension of the same constitutional process that resulted in his nomination. i am very proud of this process. what we are seeing is the third way in the middle east. we now enjoy the benefits of the arab summer for us all. we have to roll up our sleeves. it will be a very bumpy and difficult road. but i look forward to the future. again, mr. president, thank you to jordan. i hope your success will continue in your visit. >> thank you very much. it is great to be back in jordan. i am glad to speak with my friend king abdullah. thank you to the people of jordan for their extreme warmth and hospitality that i remember well from my first visit as a senator. that thing i mainly remember when i came here was his majesty personally drove me to the airport. i will not tell you how fast he was going, but secret service could not keep up. nevertheless,
would not have been possible without them. the civil rights movement which they played a leading role in pushing it forward and ending the war in vietnam and changing the way that we view citizen involvement in government, changing the way that we think about our elected officials and the ability to create upstarts' movements all of that was incredibly important and the beginning of the women's movement, all that great activism they produce. whether it is the election of barack obama and continued advancement of women and congress. all of that is a direct result of their activism and that being said there is a lot of work left undone and i think that it's what we now spend. we spend our entitlement money on people who were over the age of 30 and used to be spending three-fourths of people under the age of 30 in terms of the amount of money and investment. it's not of generational warfare but i think that we need to have a conversation about how we are dividing our priorities. it's not a generation that expect to get those entitlements. not any believe the government is going to give t
and contributions to the golden state. actor warren beatty and civil right vests are also on the list. >>> the san francisco bread company is opening a new store tomorrow. the first 100 people in line will get one free loaf of bread every day for a year. this is video from december of another store opening. organizers expect people to begin camping out tonight to reserve their spot in line. >>> mark is here now. getting a chance to meet the 49ers newest receiver today. >> also on hand was their new place kicker. mr. dawson. they're excited about this new receiver giving the 49ers another legitimate threat for their quarterback to throw to. this guy, boldin is a true professional. showed up today. now he is officially is 49er. he's actually called his quarterback to make sure the two are on the same page. all is good, although he admits initially didn't know what to make of the deal when it was first announced. >> initially was shocking. but i think once all of that wears off you get to examine the situation. for me it's great. the one thing i can
the bad guys in the civil rights movement well, the conservative ones are and they left to join the republican party and the rest stayed. ana coulter, no longer a fan of chris christie. this is ann two years ago at cpac. >> we don't run christine pelosi y i romney will be the nominee. >> she was right. this is ann. >> as you know i have loved chris christie, i'm a single voter against amnesty so christie is off my list. >> john: i guess ronald reagan is also off her list because reagan gave amnesty. are you surprised that ann coulter is fickle in they they are affection? >> i am. i trust everything that comes out of her. there is no one more abhor rent than she is. i can't believe they give her a platform. she gets under my nerves. >> john: were you surprised to see ann coulter to a flip flop on her savior and the most electable republican. >> she's rich for a reason. she's a salacious factory. an internet mean factory. that's why she's the best seller. >> you know i talk to joy behar about this a lot. she said she's a joke. but she's evil. >> john: but she talks evil. let's say
that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations, this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally, growing up in far-flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a home. [ applause ] of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom expressed on passover, we also know that here on earth we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect world. that means accepting our measure of sacrifice and struggle, just like previous generations. it means us working through generation after generation on behalf of that ideal of freedom. as dr. martin luther king said on the day before he was killed, i may not get there with you, but i want you to know that we as a people will get to the promiseland. so just -- [ applause ] -- so just as joshua carried on after moses, the work goes on for all of you, the joshua generation. for justice and dignity, for opportunity and freedo
secretary. assista assistant attorney general for the civil rights. we will bring you that press conference as soon as it does happen. but again, another announcement of a nominee to his cabinet from the white house. >> maintaining a hispanic is very important point in the cabinet. >>> let's check on the market in chicago. rick santelli is with the "santelli exchange." >> thanks, simon. i would like to welcome our guest. i'm really glad zach is my guest today because i think he's one of the most sensible, everybody keeled people on our air. >> thank you, rick. >> okay, now, i read your notion of how we should approach the news of the weekend and indeed today regarding cyprus. i would like you to share that with the viewers and listeners. >> yeah, i mean, this definitely is one of these moments of mind-boggling market excuses for what looks to be like a pretty modest sell-off. i mean, this has been talked about a lot this morning but i'm going to repeat. . one half% of the entire eu gdp. cyprus approaches the earnings of apple so we really are in the realm of psychology. unless you believe t
, reporting live. >>> it is the civil rights issue of our time. same-sex marriage. the supreme court begins hearing arguments next week. coming up, we'll talk about whether political pressure will weigh on the justices. [ female announcer ] new york strips. sudden trips. mr. wiggles and curling irons. for the little mishaps you feel, use neosporin to help you heal. it kills germs so you heal four days faster neosporin. also try neosporin eczema essentials. all your important legal matters in just minutes. protect your family... and launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. and launch your dreams. today is gonna be an important day for us. you ready? we wanna be our brother's keeper. what's number two we wanna do? bring it up to 90 decatherms. how bout ya, joe? let's go ahead and bring it online. attention on site, attention on site. now starting unit nine. some of the world's cleanest gas turbines are now powering some of america's biggest cities. siemens. answers. are you flo? yes. is this the thing you gave my husband? well, yeah, yes. the "name your price"
the long years of the civil rights and women's rights movements, the speed with which more and more people have come to embrace the dignity and equality of lgbt americans has been breathtaking and inspiring. we see it all around us every day in major cultural statements and in quiet family moments. but the journey is far from over, and, therefore, we must keep working to make our country freer and fairer and to continue to inspire the faith the world puts in our leadership. in doing so, we will keep moving closer and closer to that more perfect union promised to us all. >> "we." chad. "we." >> look, chris -- >> is she running for president? did she tell you? >> she did not tell me. we didn't talk about that. the "washington post" came out with a poll today that shows that 58% of americans support marriage equality. 81% of people under the age of 30. chris, 81% of people in this country don't agree on anything these days. 81% of people under the age of 30. i think it's going to become increasingly difficult for anyone of either party to run for public office if they're anti-gay and hold ant
are accused of a crime have a right to a public defender but most of the cases are in civil court, child custody, workers right, compensation for catastrophic injuries. where is the combid gideon for this? >> it's not there. when you start caring about these issues, they expand. that's okay. the question that i will address and i have been interested in it since 1962. i'm quite mature. and been working on it my own little way. it has to do with the right to counsel in civil case. i will tell you 3 stories. if i give you the statistics, if i sit here and tell you 6 out of 10 middle class people who go to court do not have a lawyer or 8 out of 10 do not have a lawyer. i have diminished those people and in this culture that's one way to take care of the problem because it's almost gone when you hear it. i will tell you 3 stories. a us citizen born and raised in hawthorne california with a limited mental capacity, having lived in the united states, living with his mother and 3 other kids. got arrested on a small trespass. he entered what i can call a criminal factory known as the main jail
like this? avery freedman is a law professor and attorney specializing in civil rights. he's joining us right now from cleveland. good to see you, avery. >> hi, fredricka. nice to see you. >> obviously the anonymous call by someone appalled with this facebook pose of an 11-year-old with a supposed assault rifle. >> it's very interesting. i think it's an extraordinary case because until such time as vice president biden and certainly the congress actually gets to the point of outlawing such weapons, they are legal. and in new jersey the question really became is it unlawful for a child to be posed in a facebook photograph. so what the local officials did, fredricka, is there was a raid on the house of police and children services. once the owner of the home, the father of this child called his attorney, the attorney says you've got to get out of the house until you get a warrant. so law enforcement left. it's this convergence of government trying jitter ri about the guns in the wrong hands and protect against the right of search and seizure and first amendment right of expression. >> so
as a civil rights issue as gay marriage or gay rights in general, i would hope our elected officials have open mindedness about the ability to conceive it differently down the road if it effects them personally. >> you're not going to get any admission of that sort from john boehner. his job there i guess was to give that particular answer, his party would be horrified if he said anything -- >> i mean, we're just about to have the supreme court case, doma, prop 8, we know where he is in support of doma, it would be difficult. >> if you're a republican operative at this juncture, you can't deny the math. you look at this, say the new poll, 81% under 30 support gay marriage. 40% of seniors. eventually will be well called the majority. maybe it is time to get ahead of the curve. >> thank you both for joining me tonight. >>> coming up, the surprising agreement between john boehner and president obama. they finally agree on something and it is no small thing. it is a really huge thing. the debt. in the "rewrite," i am going to show you jokes that sarah palin told at cpac, not because they're s
the civil- rights movement live from the virginia festival of the book, live tonight at 8:00 on c-span 2. >> "washington journal" continues. allison is here to discuss congressman's ethics. tell us about the role of the house and senate ethics committees. who makes the rules? house and the senate make their own rules how the ethics committee's proceed and it is different from normal committees. both of those committees are the only two committees in congress that have an equal number of democrats and republicans. when we think about how committee's work, house and the power that a chairman as about legislation or tabling things, that is not how the ethics committee works. both the chairman and a working member are supposed to work together from both parties and they are supposed to be some collegiality and agreement on how they move forward. when somebodygins makes a complaint to the committee. there is a format in which they have to do it. a member of the public and also make a complex but that will only act on it if a member of the house signed an affidavit saying this meets the standa
we're going to win 5-4. i think this is a basic civil rights issue. i don't think this is a kind of issue that will divide the court the way some other issues divide the court. >> do you think it's possible the court makes a decision that doesn't resolve the right question? in other words, it doesn't resolve whether there's a right to marry? >> they could. there's a technical issue called standing that's raised here and the court could decide that the defendants don't have standing. that would result in allowing marriage equality in california because it would affirm the district court but it would not have any general applicability. >> we will be watching, mr. boies. thank you for being here. we're going to take a break. more from our roundtable as we get reaction to the gun debate that you've heard here this [ male announcer ] this is kevin. to prove to you that aleve is the better choice for him, he's agreed to give it up. that's today? [ male announcer ] we'll be with him all day as he goes back to taking tylenol. i was okay, but after lunch my knee started to hurt again. and
're right the mental health system needs to be fixed. the civil commitment laws are in a mess. every police officer knows that. we can't even, as i said before, i've been working for 20 years to get those adjudicated, mentally incompetent and dangerous, into the national check system. we're still trying to get that done, and we need enforcement of the federal gun laws. we want to do the real things that make people safe. i mean, what's appalled me about this whole debate is how little it's had to do with making people safe and how much it has to do with the decade agenda to attack the second amendment. >> bottom line. will president obama sign a new set of gun control measures? >> i hope we end up signing something that updates the system and gets those mentally incompetent and adjudicated into the system. we forced the administration somehow to enforce the federal gun laws. i know they don't want to do it but they ought to do it. it's their responsibility. that would make people safe. put programs like project exile in every american city where if you're a drug dealer, a gang member, or a
're meddling. if we stay back, they say why aren't you standing up for civil rights. >> guest: absolutely. and i think that is the fate of a superpower, right? it is a catch 22. people want you to deliver for them, but they don't necessarily want to give you what it takes to deliver for others. so it's all about your own, your own interests. and, um, i do quote the this official who say we're kind of damned if we do, damned if we don't. and, you know, the pendulum swings constantly. it's a cyclical thing. look at syria now. people are very, very upset in syria and in the region to some extent and here in the u.s. you listen to senator john mccain, very upset that the u.s. isn't intervening, isn't doing something. there was, you know, perhaps as much upset when the u.s. decided to go to war in iraq. now there's upset because of inaction, and, you know, under the bush administration there was upset because of action. so it's a struggle to find that fine line. >> host: i think it's break time. [laughter] >> guest: great. >> on the go? "after words" is available via podcast. visit booktv.org
people's civil rights, and then get sued. and robert says it's definitely an overreach of the police and needs to be addressed in the courts. go to our facebook page right now and join the conversation and don't forget to like "the ed show" when you're there. we'll be right back. you ready? we wanna be our brother's keeper. what's number two we wanna do? bring it up to 90 decatherms. how bout ya, joe? let's go ahead and bring it online. attention on site, attention on site. now starting unit nine. some of the world's cleanest gas turbines are now powering some of america's biggest cities. siemens. answers. it fills you with energy... and it gives you what you are looking for to live a more natural life. in a convenient two bar pack. this is nature valley. nature at its most delicious. plus the perfecting color of a bb cream equal? introducing the newest beauty trend. total effects cc cream c for color. c for correction. [ female announcer ] fight 7 signs of aging flawlessly. cc for yourself. >>> sometimes i reflect, you know, is there something else i could do to make these guys -- i
it's a civil rights issue. >> state to state married in one state and. marriage equality has to be national. >> bill: i love this marriage equality. see that can extend out to other groups than other than homosexuals. if you want marriage equality then it's got to be a free fire zone that anybody who wants to get married. triads and. >> there is a push for triads. >> i like the word equality. >> bill: it's a cliche that you guys put out there. >> that's what the parlance is right now. >> bill: if you are going to be a good liberal, colmes, you have to extend equality to everyone. not just selected groups. so marriage equality then encompasses everybody. one issue is demographics is changing. younger group even republicans hear less about some of these social issues. >> they don't care about the issue. would you agree with that? younger americans not a priority for them? >> i think so. what you saw in the 2008 election cycle is barack obama won them by like 70%. now they are essentially locked into voting democrat maybe for the rest of their lives. >> bill: i just want to revi
about the struggles of the palestinians and the israel business the civil rights struggle, with the fact that you israelis have fought for this land. you fought to overcome your struggles just as my children in another generation would not have had equal rights. so he really tried to make it a personal appeal. and that i think had some resonance in talking to the host of the "meet the press" here in israel and very widely known anchor. and she said the follow-up is the main concern. but that it was a very different kind of speech and very appealing to the people there in the room. >> and making that personal appeal something the president does very well. thanks again and safe travels. i want to bring you in. you wrote about some of the symbolism sort of both direct and more subtle references that you saw in the president's itinerary. tell us a bit more about what you're seeing there. >> definitely everything was planned in the sense of making sure that obama touches on all the bases. and corrects all the mistakes that were perceived by the israelis and jewish americans in his first term.
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